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Product Help Posts

TweetReach: Where our Twitter data comes from

We’ve written before about the five questions you should be asking your social analytics provider, and we wanted to make it clear what you’re getting when you choose TweetReach Pro. If you still have questions after you read this, feel free to share them in the comments below, or drop us a line. We’ll be happy toMore

TweetReach Tip: Less is more with snapshot reports

Keep it simple with TweetReach snapshot reports! Here are a few things to keep in mind when you’re running a snapshot report: 1. Snapshots will analyze tweets up to one week old. Snapshots pull tweets from up to 7 days ago, so be sure you run them as soon as you can after your event.More

TweetReach Tip: Tracking words with accent marks

When you’re setting up a Tracker in your Pro account we want to make sure you get the best results possible. One thing that can be tricky is words with accent marks, such as crêpe, doppelgänger, or crème brûlée. Twitter treats accented letters as completely different letters from their unaccented counterparts. If you are searching for a hashtagMore

TweetReach Tip: Saving your snapshot reports

  You don’t have to go Pro to save your TweetReach snapshot reports. As long as you’ve registered for a free TweetReach account - and you’re logged in! – you can save every report you run for future access in your My Reports archive. That applies to both free, 100-tweet snapshots, as well as full, $20More

TweetReach Tip: Snapshot report receipts

If you buy one of our full snapshot reports (up to 1500 tweets, posted up to one week ago), then we’ll send you an email with your snapshot report, as well as a receipt for your purchase. In that report email, you’ll have links to access your report and receipt online, download a PDF, export aMore

TweetReach Tip: Excluding tweets from your search

You can exclude certain tweets from your results by using the minus (“-”) operator in your TweetReach search. You can exclude tweets that include certain keywords or tweets that mention a certain account. For example:  Sandwiches -ham  or #swag -justinbieber The second example is a good one to use if you find a spammer orMore

TweetReach Tip: Searching for a specific tweet

Say you want to search for a specific tweet in a snapshot report, like this one from our Twitter timeline: Be sure to search for the text of the tweet, rather than the tweet’s unique URL. Try searching for the first part of the tweet text. Keep it short – under 60 characters – andMore

TweetReach Tip: Searching for URLs

If you want to follow a piece of news through Twitter, try searching for the article’s URL instead of its title or a set of keywords. In TweetReach snapshot reports, we can search for a root URL, so even if a link is shrunk into a t.co, bit.ly or other shortener, we’ll pick it up. Some moreMore

TweetReach Tip: Searching for more than one term in a snapshot report

If you want to run a TweetReach snapshot report for more than one term, be sure to remember the magic of the “OR” operator. You can search for any two or three queries by combining them together with OR. Example: term1 OR term2 – search for tweets containing either term1 or term2 (e.g. analytics OR metrics)More

TweetReach Tip: Measuring the results of a Twitter contest

If you’re running a contest and using TweetReach to track it, you’ll want to take a look at this post so you don’t miss any of the tweets you want to capture. For best results, we have a few suggestions. Keep your original tweet short (120 characters or less) and unique, and use hashtags andMore