The Week in Social #174

We spend the week reading the best things we can get our eyeballs on and on Fridays we share them here with you. Leave your thoughts in the comments, or come find us on Twitter at @UnionMetrics.

On video and visuals.

While answers vary as to what, exactly, the visual web is, everyone does seem to agree that it’s very important. You can see these responses in eMarketer’s What Is the Visual Web?: Instagram, Pinterest are the social sites most closely associated with the visual web:

visual web

“Asked specifically about social media, respondents said Instagram was the service most closely associated with the visual web. At 92.4% of respondents, Instagram was about 10 percentage points ahead of second-place Pinterest. Facebook, at 58.1%, and Vine, at 56.2%, were far behind, and less than half of respondents (47.6%) named Snapchat.”

Emphasis added.

For those more specifically interested in the state of social video, check out 10 big trends happening in social video by Ben Davis for Econsultancy, and to act on that knowledge, check out 3 Types of Video to Incorporate Into Your Social Media Strategy via Navneet Kaushal for Social Media Today.

If you’re still skeptical about video numbers, you might want to take a look at Seven in 10 US Internet Users Watch OTT Video: The vast majority are regular YouTube viewers also from eMarketer.

OTT video service

 

The times, they are a changin’.

On Twitter.

You’ve probably heard of Twitter’s launch of Moments this week, but what about Twitter’s “Promoted Moments” & What They Mean for Brands? Aaron Rales sums it up for Ogilvy:

“Instead of slotting promoted tweets within live Moments feeds, Twitter is giving brands their own Moments called Promoted Moments. The Company is calling them ‘dedicated pieces of real estate…where a brand can curate a series of different tweets or Vines to actually tell their story.’ Like a Promoted Trend, Promoted Moments will be considered ‘premium’ purchases and thus given significant visibility on the platform (they’ll appear in every category list of Moments). Pricing has not yet been disclosed and testing will begin in ‘weeks, not months’ according to the company.”

See more brand implications + specifications at the link.

If you think earthquakes have nothing to do with marketing you’re right, except in the case of this particular case study Andrew Hutchinson broke down for Social Media Today: What Marketers Can Learn from How Tweets are Used to Track Earthquakes.

“The USGS case study provides an insightful example of how social data can be used, and the importance of tracking the right information to convert social data into something practical. The first step in the process is ascertaining what it is, exactly, you need to know. In this case, the team have started with mentions of earthquakes then narrowed down the data by cross-matching posts for relevance. For your business, maybe you’re tracking all mentions of your brand name (which you should be), maybe all mentions of your industry, all of your target keywords in some capacity. Track too much and you’ll likely never glean much insight, as you’ll be setting yourself a mammoth task in monitoring all those mentions every day. But through refining, though working out the key messages you need to track that are actually actionable and relevant to your business interests, you can focus your efforts onto the conversations and mentions that matter the most.

Emphasis added. Oh, and we can help with that refined tracking, by the way.

On everything else.

Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief Jenn Deering Davis tells it like it is in Mastering Engagement in Emerging Social Channels (by Anna Papachristos for 1to1 Media); calling networks like Snapchat, Instagram and Pinterest “unconventional” really sells them short. She also takes a look at the 11 most memorable social media marketing successes of 2015 (by James A. Martin for Network World) along with some other marketers, for all your 2016 content planning needs.

And finally, Jay Baer of Convince & Convert tells it like it is: Your Blog Post Is Too Damn Long aka tl;dr.

So thanks if you’ve made it this far.


Image source: The Found Animals Foundation.