Ranking the GOP candidates on Twitter

A month ago, we wrote a little about the first round of GOP debates. Today, as we prepare for the next debate, let’s take a look at how the remaining Republican candidates are doing on Twitter. Here’s a list of the candidates in the debate tonight, ordered by how many tweets* have been posted about them in the past month.

Tweets about GOP candidates

As he has for several months, Trump continues to dominate the GOP conversation on Twitter, generating 10x more tweets than his closest competitor. What has changed is who Trump’s competitors are. Cruz and Bush are still round out the top three, but Carson and Fiorina have both seen tremendous growth in Twitter conversation in the past month and their popularity on Twitter has more than tripled since the last debate. Paul has dropped down the list since the last debate.

This chart shows a comparison between the top candidates (minus Trump, since his tweet volumes dwarf all others).
GOP Candidates on TwitterA few other interesting things to note about this data. Only one candidate has seen decreases in Twitter conversation since the first debate: John Kasich. That doesn’t bode well for his future in this presidential race. In addition, these numbers reflect some of what we saw in this week’s New York Times/CBS News poll, including the increase in popularity of Ben Carson.

9/17/15 update: We took at look at tweets posted during and after the debate to see how Twitter thought the candidates performed. Carly Fiorina was the overwhelming favorite on Twitter, generating nearly 250k tweets during the debate. She’s been trending up on Twitter for a while and solidified that last night. In comparison, there were about 500k tweets about Donald Trump during the debate. While that is still 2x the volume Fiorina received, up until now, Trump has been getting 10x more tweets than his closest competitor. Fiorina is rapidly closing that gap. The next closest was Jeb Bush, we received just under 200k tweets during the debate.

We’ll keep watching the tweets throughout the election and update as things get interesting! And if you want metrics or graphs like these for your own brand, take a look at the social media analytics we offer at Union Metrics.

*This includes all tweets that match a set of search terms about the candidate, including account mentions and hashtags. Tweets were posted between August 17 and September 16.