The Week in Social #161

It’s Friday the Thursday before an observed July 4th holiday here in the U.S., and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On storytelling.

The Secret Every Great Storyteller Knows [from Social Media Today; written by Bree Baich]

If you want to be a great storyteller, you must first and foremost be a great listener.

Digital Storytelling: How to Share Ideas in Innovative Ways [from The Buzz Bin; written by Rachel McPherson]

If you have the resources to literally immerse your audience in your content, then do it. For example, this Interactive Everest Climb from The Washington Post:

everest-promo-new

Content marketing, strategy, and inspiration from recent great campaigns and stories.

“How to” Videos – A Golden Opportunity for Brands to Generate Content [from Business2Community; written by Elizabeth Dyrsmid]

Demo your products, help your customers solve their problems, and do it all in the hot content format of the moment: video.

10 Stupidly Simple “Hacks” To Win At Content Marketing [from MarketingLand; written by Quinn Whissen]

“Content marketing is hard. But it doesn’t have to be boring.”

Read on for the author’s list of “tiny, innovative tests” that can “drive serious results”. And remember that people are lazy: Make it easy for them by creating content that will solve their problems.

Facebook content strategy is a time bomb for inbound marketing [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

“A few years ago, the major social platforms were happy to have your links to great content but now they are transforming themselves into virtual news and entertainment channels because they want you to spend time on their site, not yours.”

The landscape is changing. What do you think?

11 best social campaigns and stories from June 2015 [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

These monthly roundups from Econsultancy should go on your must reads for content marketing inspiration.

And finally, on getting that content shared, and how networks can trick us.

Five reasons people share content [from We Are Social; written by Lisa Collins]

“In his analysis of The New York Times study social media guru Jeff Bullas claims there are five reasons that we share content with others:

  1. To bring valuable and entertaining content to others
  2. To define ourselves to others
  3. To grow and nourish our relationships
  4. Self-fulfilment
  5. To get the word out about causes and brands”

So: Awe your audience. It’s that simple, and that difficult.

The Social-Network Illusion That Tricks Your Mind [from MIT Technology Review]

Meet the Majority Illusion:

Majority illussion

“They illustrate this illusion with a theoretical example: a set of 14 nodes linked up to form a small world network, just like a real social network (see picture above). They then color three of these nodes and count how many of the remaining nodes link to them in a single step.

Two versions of this setup are shown above. In the left-hand example, the uncolored nodes see more than half of their neighbors as colored. In the right-hand example, this is not true for any of the uncolored nodes.

But here’s the thing: the structure of the network is the same in both cases. The only thing that changes is the nodes that are colored.

This is the majority illusion—the local impression that a specific attribute is common when the global truth is entirely different.”

Marketers may recognize this in the form of identifying the influencers in any particular space.

Bonus read: How to Build Rapport and Pitch Media Using Twitter via SHIFT Comm.