Understand how Instagram content performs on Twitter using TweetReach by Union Metrics

The lamentations of Twitter display cards being turned off for Instagram posts may have died out, but the need to measure all aspects of a content marketing strategy has only intensified, particularly when it comes to the visual. So how can you track and measure your Instagram content’s performance on Twitter? Let us show you how, using TweetReach.

The basics of URL tracking with TweetReach

The best way to keep track via TweetReach of how an Instagram photo travels around Twitter is by tracking its URL. TweetReach Trackers can monitor up to 15 separate queries about a single campaign or topic, including one or more URLs. (Full details on setting up topic Trackers here.) Here’s an example of how to set one up for specifically tracking a single Instagram URL:

Instagram tracking

URL queries should be set up as url_contains:instagram.com/p/utBPU3D5cL or with the full URL in quotes, as in the screenshot above. (You can find more details about specific searches and URL queries here.) This will search for all tweets containing this URL or portion of URL. Be sure that you have the full URL for a particular photo you want to track, since just adding a basic Instagram address (instagram.com) would return information on every Instagram photo posted to Twitter, drowning out the results you want.

Also keep in mind that a Tracker will find all tweets that match any of your search queries and aggregate their metrics together in your Tracker, so make sure all the queries in a Tracker are related; in this case one or more Instagram photos, depending on if you want to track a single photo or a set. You can drill down into some details (usernames, hashtags, URLs, etc…) if you set up all the terms around a campaign, but summary metrics will be calculated for the entire set of tweets.

So if you really want to concentrate on the data for just your Instagram photos, consider setting up a separate Tracker for any hashtags or keywords.

What if I already have a Tracker running, and want to see how the Instagram content I’ve cross-posted is doing?

Great question! First, check the Top URLs section of your Tracker to see if any Instagram links are there:

UA Women links

 

If you don’t see any, don’t get discouraged. Clicking on the menu bar in the top right corner of that section (the three dots and three lines) will take you to a full list of URLs shared that is automatically ranked by impressions, but you can change that to reflect ranking by tweets, retweets, or contributors as you prefer.

UAWomen URLs

We recommend paying attention to how your Instagram and other visual content URLs rank depending on how you’ve sorted them. This way you can answer some questions about your content strategy so far: How many of your tweets contain Instagram URLs? Do those get retweeted more or less than those with other content type URLs? The answer to these questions can help you tweak your content strategy, including how often and how you share Instagram content via Twitter.

Find even more details

Click through on each high-ranking Instagram link to see what these high performing visual content pieces have in common. Is it a hashtag you used with all of them? The subject matter, like the inclusion of a celebrity spokesperson? It might even just be the lighting, tone (warm or cool), or absence or presence of people in the photos. Finding a common thread in your Instagram posts will let you know how to best present your content for the maximum impact on your audience.

This page will also tell you which day a link was posted when you hover over a spike in the display, letting you know if certain days of the week work better for certain content (because you should repeat these steps with every kind of content that you’re producing, from YouTube videos to blog URLs):

Instagram URL day posted

If you have fans and followers who independently share your Instagram URLs to their audiences, you’ll likely see this show up here since they can only share it after you have initially posted it. Watching the performance of a repost from your Instagram account can let you know which of your fans and followers have a strong following of their own. In time you can consider them for a brand ambassador partnership if appropriate, or see if they would be interested in using your product in a sponsored post. You can even just thank and reward them for being a dedicated follower.

The bottom line?

Keeping track of what kind of content consistently performs the best with your audience lets you know what kind of content to plan more of for the future. Knowing how your Instagram content is performing is simply one piece of that puzzle, which TweetReach can help put together.