The Week in Social Analytics #121

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

On Tumblr: 

How to Do Native Advertising Right on Tumblr [from Yahoo Advertising; written by Team]

Deliver good content consistently 

Tumblr is known for original, striking content. Make your posts stand out enough to grab attention on users’ dashboards, the primary destination on Tumblr.”

The evolution of Tumblr: From micro-blogging platform to an eco-system of content [from Taylor PR; written by Sandeena Ahmed]

“This is where I think Tumblr’s evolution is best illustrated; in the interaction between and creation of various subcultures on this platform. What started as a way to micro-blog (a change of pace from the Blogger, Livejournal, and WordPress days) has turned into a thriving eco-system of content. Tumblr gives you a platform to post about art that you have created, articles that you enjoy, TV and movies that you adore, and discuss and argue on everything from the latest fashion trends to the ontological value of the pineapple in SpongeBob Squarepants.”

Brands need to fully understand how a platform’s users express themselves in each place, and how their interactions and content production differ even among different subcultures on the same platform. Once they do that work, then they can begin to contribute valuable content and become a part of the conversation.

On Instagram: 

5 Ways to Fall into Instagram Marketing [from Business 2 Community; written by Kelly Shepsko]

“One tried and true way of increasing your following and engagement on your content is by following others and engaging on their content. Search hashtags to locate target audience members, whether your company is B2C or B2B. Follow relevant users and then periodically engage on their posts by liking their photos or commenting. However, you don’t want to sound “spammy”, so don’t bombard them with your sales pitch!”

On visual content marketing & storytelling: 

Incorporate Visual Social Media in Your Content Strategy [from Spin Sucks; written by Carol Scott]

Includes some important steps for brands creating a visual social strategy:

Think broadly about your visuals. Not every pin or Instagram photo has to be (or should be) focused on your brand. Capital One and American Express both maintain pinboards for brides, world travelers, and bucket-list creators. These images are inherently shareable, regardless of a user’s affiliation with the companies, which makes it easier for the brands to spread organically.”

10 Tips for Managing Your Visual Content (Without Going Crazy) [from Marketing Profs; written by Liz McLellan]

If you’re a large company with a large amount of unorganized visual assets, then you definitely want to look to this piece for advice on how to manage your various digital assets.

The 3 Factors That Drive Content Marketing Success [from B2B Marketing Insider; written by Michael Brenner]

“. . .one of my biggest secrets is that I don’t spend nearly as much time writing as you might think. I am opportunistic with re-purposing the content I already create.”

Tip: Data isn’t sexy, but visual storytelling is [from Social Fresh; written by Jason Keath]

“Find the data. Make it visual. Share. Rinse, repeat.”

What is storytelling for brands and why do you need it? [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

“Storytelling in marketing terms isn’t just about telling ‘a story’ (producing an advert where a narrative arc occurs), it’s about telling the story of the ‘brand’ across multiple channels and using various tools and methods.”

On Twitter: 

Study: Live-Tweeting lifts Tweet volume, builds a social audience for your show [from Twitter; written by Anjali Midha]

“Besides increasing the volume of Tweets about a show, live-Tweeting can contribute to building an audience on Twitter.”

You can also look at this data in alternate chart form from Marketing Charts.

How to blast your Twitter engagement rates through the roof [from Econsultancy; written by Matt Owen]

“People like big, colourful pictures. They like them more if they look like they include information, and there are twin psychological reasons for this.

  • Firstly, it’s a (I’m sorry for using this phrase, I really am) value-add. You don’t even have to click on a link to get at that sweet sweet insight.
  • Secondly, it’s easy to share this and show people that you too are a valuable source of information (Or if you’re like me, at least give the appearance of knowing what you’re talking about).”