The Week in Social Analytics #106

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

First: Edelman Digital’s new Entertainment Study is out this week.

The Best and Worst of Real-Time Marketing: 4 Lessons for Marketers  [from Fast Company; written by Ekaterina Walter]

Stay relevant and add value- in the right tone- while also enhancing customer service.

How Big Brands Keep Their Social Media Audiences Engaged [from Social Media Examiner; written by Lisa Furgison]

Learn from the biggest and best.

Getting Started With Social Video | Infographic [from Business2Community; written by Megan Ritter]

“Research shows that YouTube works well for How-To guides and instruction videos, while Instagram & Vine allow users short snippets of video; perfect for for announcing an upcoming event or generating interest in a brand new product.

Google Hangouts have proven to be more suitable for business-to-business marketing. Vimeo prides itself in high-quality videos.”

New Research Article: “How Do Health Researchers Use Social Media?” [from The Library Journal; written by Gary Price]

“As the United States moves forward with health reform, the communication gap between researchers and policy makers will need to be narrowed to promote policies informed by evidence.

Social media represent an expanding channel for communication. Academic journals, public health agencies, and health care organizations are increasingly using social media to communicate health information. For example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now regularly tweets to 290,000 followers.”

Using Social Media for Restaurant Marketing [from Social Media Today; written by Lauren Marinigh]

The most powerful social tools for restaurants are visual, such as Instagram:

“Take photos of your daily or weekly specials to share with the Instagram world, take customers behind the scenes in the kitchen with how you prepare or make some of your menu items, educate the Instagram world on different fun facts on how you are sustainable. Ideas for Instagram are endless for the food venue and one of the most valuable tools you can have.”

Is Instagram Your Visual Content Marketing Superpower? [from Heidi Cohen]

“Georgia Tech and Yahoo Labs researchers found Instagram photos containing faces were 38% more likely to receive likes and 32% more likely to receive comments, even after controlling for social network reach and activity. However, the number of faces, their ages and gender in the photo didn’t have an effect.”

10 Tips to Improve Your Pinterest Marketing Strategy [from Social Mouths; written by William Johnson]

“Before you start, ask yourself these 4 important questions:

  • Is your business visual?
  • Do you have access to images?
  • Is your target market primarily female?
  • Can your website be easily updated with images and content?”

3 Easy Ways Startups Can Use Twitter to Perform Marketing Research [from Social Media Today; written by Ray Wang]

“By leveraging Twitter, start-ups can. . .listen to their target audience’s conversations and learn about their problems, dissatisfactions, and product features they desire. This marketing research approach can help start-ups discover new business opportunities and unravel overlooked problems.”

Why Apple Doesn’t Tweet [from KISSMetrics; written by Sherice Jacob]

“On the surface, it’s difficult to glean any shred of insight from Apple’s hands-off social strategy. True, when innovation and premium experience are the hallmarks you want to be known for, then being a chatty Cathy on social media clashes against that brand image. There’s also the aspect of control. When you keep a tightly-run ship, it’s hard for leaks to penetrate. Still, there’s no excuse for sticking your digital head in the sand and hoping no one notices your failures. Perhaps Apple feels better equipped to handle the customer experience in its stores rather than on its screens.”