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This Week in Social Media Analytics #61

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

The Teacher’s Guide to Social Media [from Mashable; written by Eric Larson]

Some common sense advice, plus some great resources for teachers looking to connect with students and parents in the social realm.

Social Media and Consumer Empowerment Don’t Match, Study [from SocialBarrel; written by Neal Lasta]

 “According to a study conducted by the Journal of Consumer Research, once a consumer is empowered, it gets very hard to influence him or her through social media.”

Link to purchase full study in the quote above.

Mobile Tops Desktop for Social Sharing [from eMarkter; written by eMarketer staff]

“Twitter was well represented for sharing media and publishing content, and nearly as common a platform for consumer brand info as Facebook.”

Mark Twain’s 10-Sentence Course on Branding and Marketing [from MarketingProfs; written by Tom Bentley]

1. Many a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising.

Seth Godin remarked that today’s publishing, with its instant electronic availability, has made the physical book a trophy of sorts, a kind of souvenir. Twain was 100 years ahead of Seth.”

Entertaining- it is filled with a lot of Twain zingers, after all- and applicable.

3 Social Media Questions Every Brand Should Ask Itself [from Fast Company; written by Hayes Davis]

“Brands often look for absolutes on social media–i.e., customers either love them or hate them. Don’t fall into the sentiment trap and look only at compliments or complaints; mine the entire conversations for trends. Are there hidden messages that might not even be directed at your brand that can tell you a lot about underlying consumer wants and needs? Sometimes there is a larger story in what customers are implicitly saying.”

Our CEO wrote this, so we might be a little biased, but we think it’s a great piece.

Tweets power “the shortest NASCAR race in history” in ad from never.no, Sprint and Leo Burnett [from The Drum; written by Jennifer Faull]

“Billed as ‘the shortest race in NASCAR history’, the 60-second ‘race’ asked fans to Tweet their favourite driver’s car number, along with the hashtag #Sprint60. Each Tweet increased the driver’s speed, pushing them faster along the track as viewers watched the progress live.”

We Are Social launches Siemens’ global recruitment campaign via Tumblr [from Campaign; written by Lynsey Barber]

“‘Tumblr is increasingly popular with a young audience, and people are already sharing and commenting on content on the platform, so it was the natural choice for this campaign.’”

Creating a Meaningful Tumblr Campaign [from ClickZ; written by Tessa Wegert]

“The success of Tumblr campaigns depends on the ability of brand marketers to make their ads and blogs as interesting as the user-generated content they’ll ultimately sit alongside.”

Great examples of some recent Tumblr campaigns.